News


Do All-Cash Purchases Make Sense?

Oct 13
4:04
PM
2016
Category | Homebuying

Often is the question asked, “What’s up with paying for a property in cash?”, albeit in slightly more technical language. For buyers, the market is tough right now, as there’s not a lot in the way of inventory, and sellers often receive multiple offers, especially in some parts of the nation. Many real estate agents suggest that buyers make a cash offer in order to make themselves seem more competitive and improve their chances of having their offer selected.

 

Buyers have a few options when it comes to making an offer. They can pony up cash by writing a check and backing it up with statements that disclose the balance of their accounts. They can get pre-approved, which involves having their down payment verified with asset statements; employment verified with W-2 forms, pay stubs, and tax returns; credit reviewed; and loan reviewed for underwriting. They can also be “pre-qualified,” meaning that all of that same documentation has been reviewed but not underwritten.

 

Trained loan officers tell borrowers that the last option, despite its somewhat reassuring moniker, poses certain risks to a borrower’s deposit. If the buyer puts down 20%, for instance, and the appraisal comes back lower than the price upon which both parties agreed, the buyer is faced with a situation where they have to come up with more money, pay private mortgage insurance, or convince the seller the lower the price.

 

Such a scenario can become even more complicated if the seller refuses to deviate from that agreed upon price and the buyer doesn’t have that extra money and can’t qualify if they have to pay private mortgage insurance. In this particular case, the buyer could potentially lose the deposit.

 

Cash payments do indeed make for an attractive buyer, but the wise would-be homeowner understands the difference between a cash offer, being pre-approved, and being pre-qualified along with the risks carried by their various options. Be sure to ask your loan officer their thoughts!



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